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This page is up-to-date as of version 0.0.73 (pre-beta).

The numbers on this page are all out-of-date as of closed beta. The formulas will still work fine, but I'm not going to update the numbers until the full release, otherwise I'd be constantly changing them with updates.

Overview

Each class has different skills with different damage equations and different cooldowns. So, how does one determine which class can do the most damage? There's a few ways to do it, and a few metrics that could be tested. Good metrics include max single-iteration damage, max single-rotation damage, highest per-hit damage, most damage over a set amount of time, and damage per mana use. I'm still trying to figure out a fair way to compare multi-target skills to single-target skills; for now we'll pretend everything is single-target. We'll be looking at all of these metrics for each of the four base classes (Warrior, Mage, Rogue, and Guardian). Should more classes be released, it shouldn't be difficult for you to replicate the calculations and compare any given classes.

Class Scores by Metric

MID (AU) MaSH (AU) MaSH-ET (AU/s) DPM (AU/M) SiR (AU) SiR-ET (AU/s) SiR-EM (AU/M)
Guardian 3.6 3 0.240 0.062 6 0.522 0.074
Mage 7 3 0.750 0.072 14 1.0 0.082
Rogue 4.5 4.8 0.343 0.070 9.45 0.675 0.084
Warrior 4.95 2.2 0.550 0.072 6.5 0.722 0.066
Big numbers are better. 0.063 is "avg" for AU/M.

Quick Reference for Metric Applicability

MID (Maximum Iterative Damage): A measure of the burst of damage you can deal at the start of a combat.

MaSH (Max Single-Hit Damage): Useful to see if statting into crit is a good idea, and shows efficacy against high-defense foes. It can also imply good ability to get aggro.

MaSH-ET: A more accurate measure of how good a class is at getting aggro (quickly, that is).

DPM (Damage per Mana): A rough guide for suitability at farming non-deadly monsters without stop. 0.063 is a good baseline for what's average.

SiR (Single Rotation Damage): Gives an estimate of how much damage a class deals in the first ~10 seconds of combat. It's a good way to calculate what skills to use and how much mana and time you need against a monster (a typical monster takes 8 AU to kill).

SiR-ET: How efficient a class is with its time for SiR. This metric is fairly reliable.
SiR-EM: How efficient a class is with its mana for SiR. This metric is somewhat relaible.

Disclaimer

These metrics are just numbers. They are rough, simplistic, narrow approaches to thinking about a class and the use of game mechanics by players. They are not a yardstick so much as spreading your arms wide and saying "about this long". They do not implicate that one class is better than another. These are guides to help you think about what areas a class has strengths in, and what it may be ill-equipped to handle compared to another class.

These numbers are not limitations. They are not proscriptive. Once you're in-game and playing a class, your input and human ability to interact and adapt to new situations may make many of these numbers incorrect or misleading.

They do not tell you which class is best. The best class is the one you enjoy playing most. However, these numbers might be able to help you find that class. For example, if you really enjoy killing monsters with huge single bursts of damage, you can look at the MID scores and say "hey, Rogue has a pretty high MaSH. I bet that it has huge crits!". Someone else might look at the Guardian's MID score and say "well, it doesn't have huge damage numbers, but I really enjoy when I can run up to a monster's face and laugh as I heal away all of its damage while also killing it".

Sometimes the numbers may help, and sometimes it's better to ignore them. In a primarily single-player game like AQ3D, there's no winning and losing, and whether you're playing a class someone else thinks is crap or unbalanced doesn't really matter. Just have fun.

Terms

Autoattack Unit

Damage varies based on level, defense, attack, and many other factors. So, we need a way to keep it consistent. We'll create a new term, Autoattack Unit. We define an Autoattack Unit, or AU, as the amount of damage a class deals to any given foe with a single autoattack. As long as all autoattacks between classes deal the same amount of damage, this is a very simple unit to use. If the classes vary in their average damage, then it's easy to just add a multiplier to bring all the classes into line.

The AU of a skill is how many autoattacks worth of damage it deals. For example, a Mage's Fireball deals approximately 3x the damage of an autoattack, so it is worth 3 AU. You might look at this example and think, "hey, but Fireball is a channeled skill that takes 3 seconds to cast, so shouldn't it only be 1 AU?". Your thinking highlights an important aspect of AU. It is a scalar, or a single unit. It is not a vector (a rate, in this case). If we wanted to call Fireball 1 AU, we should instead call it 1 AU per second, or 1 AU/s. AU tracked over time is defined as AU/s (Autoattack Units per second). AU/s is similar to the dps (damage per second) of many other games, but its abstraction allows for it to be a more fair measure across more situations.

Much like with time in AU/s, AU can be compared to many other numbers, such as mana. AU per mana spent is defined as AU/M. This is different to a hypothetical AU per minute (AU/m); please don't use AU/m.

Caveat of AU

AU is an abstraction, and it is subject to both benefits and limitations as a result of that. Its great benefit is its versatility, but it also has an unintuitive drawback. AU assumes that players will be mana-capped rather than health-capped. That is, players will run out of mana before they run out of health. This is a reasonable thing to assume, since unlike with mana, once you hit the end of the hp bar, you can't keep fighting. It does mean that in situations where mana isn't a limitation, AU is a poor unit with which to judge classes or skills.

Why is AU reliant on players being mana-capped? Because AU is tied to skills that deal damage, rather than to the cooldowns of those skills. When health is the primary concern and mana is of no limit, then the most important thing is to deal as much damage in as short a time as possible. AU is about magnitude of damage, not speed of damage, and thus it is more tied to mana than health.

Now, AU can be calculated as part of a vector against time (AU/s), and thus be relevant when health is the primary concen. Despite this, it will not be as precise or effective as some other unit (Cooldown Unit, CDU?). A hypothetical CDU would be able to accomodate for the downtime between skills when autoattacks could or could not be cast, and thus be optimized for making sure that there isn't any wasted time. AU is forced to abstract time into an average instead.

AU/M and AU/s

This is a complex topic, because any of the scalar metrics (AU) can be further augmented to include a mana component (AU/M). Those metrics will be calculated, but keep in  mind that they might not be very good metrics to consider. Many scalar metrics search for superlatives or otherwise "single-dimensional" information -- information that describes one single aspect of an interaction, and thus are easily distorted by trying to tack them onto a vector (time, mana, etc).

Vectorized scalar metrics can be easily identified by the "EM" (short for Encompassing Mana) or "ET" (Encompassing Time) appended to the acronym. For example, MaSH-EM is a calculation of the Max Single-Hit Damage, Encompassing Mana. Similarly, MID-ET is Max Iterative Damage, Encompassing Time.

Class Equality Multiplier

Class Equality Multiplier (CEM) is a number used to balance the net AU numbers between classes that have different base autoattack damage. It's important to note that if a class has eg. double the autoattack damage, but uses autoattacks at half the speed of other classes, then its skills could be far more powerful than those of the other classes. It could be misleading to compare such a class to others, since most of these metrics are exclusively skill-focused. Any metric that evaluates AU/s or AU/M will likely be the best comparison for classes like this.

In the example above of a class with a double-damage autoattack at half speed (compared to other classes), its results would need to be modified by a multiplier, x2.0 in this case. Because AU is based on the relationship of skill damage to autoattack damage (it is a ratio), the CEM corrects these numbers so that all classes have the same effective results. If it were not included, a class whose autoattack damage was double that of other classes but whose skills all had AUs of 0.5 or 1 would appear to compare poorly vs classes with skill AUs of 2 or 3, despite the actual damage output being very similar.

Max Iteration Damage

Max Iteration Damage (MID) is the maximum amount of damage that a class gets out of using each of its skills once, in their optimal configuration. It does not consider time, cooldowns, number of foes, or mana use. It does consider buff and DoT durations. It could be more accurately called Max Single-Iteration Damage (MaSID) but the acronym for that wasn't as pretty. MID is tracked in AU.

Method

To determine MID, we will cast each of a class's skills once, in whatever order produces the most damage. If some skills are buffs that do not affect damage, we will ignore those. If a buff does affect damage, then it will be included such as to best make use of its duration. DoTs will be treated similarly -- if changing the order of skills makes a difference because of DoT ticks, then the optimal configuation will be used. DoTs will include all of their tick damage regardless of what order skills are put in.

Because MID generally does not consider time or mana, its output will be expressed in AU.

Guardian

Guardian has two damage-dealing skills, one heal, and one defense buff. Because this is a MID test, Guardian Strike will only be used once.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU Guardian Strike Dragon's Breath Healing Strike Guardian's Oath

AU

- 1 2 .6 0 1 3.6

Mage

Mage has three damage-dealing skills, but none are debuffs. For practicallity we'll start with fireball, then use Lightning Stirke then Magic Shockwave, but the order doesn't matter.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU Fireball Lightning Strike Magic Shockwave Mana Shield

AU

- 3 2 2 0 1 7

Rogue

Rogue doesn't function as well with fewer Poison stacks, but just like guardian, it only gets one poison strike for this type of test. Rogue has more complicated mechanics than Mage and Guardian, so the entries are a little messier. Spin Kick is active for the entire MID test, and Poison Strike's DoT is allowed to tick to full while also being able to be consumed by Scorpion Tail Strike.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU Stealth Spin Kick Poison Strike Scorpion Tail Strike

AU

- x2.0 STS dmg x1.2 dmg, 0.5 1.25 1.25 1 3
After multipliers: - - 1.5 3 1 4.5

Warrior

Because the MID test takes into account the most optimal situation, warrior will be considered to be at a sliver of health so that they may get the best results out of whirlwind. Even though it makes no difference, Rending Cut and the other skills will be used in an order that makes the most practical sense.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU War Cry Rending Cut Vorpal Strike Whirlwind

AU

- x1.1 dmg 0.5 2 2 1 4.5
After multipliers: - 0.55 2.2 2.2 1 4.95

Max Single-Hit Damage

Max Single-Hit Damage (MaSH, or MASH) is the maximum amount of damage that a class gets out of using a single skill in its most optimal situation. It does not consider time, cooldowns, number of foes, DoTs, or mana use. It does consider buffs, and includes the use of other skills to set up for the maximum damage. MaSH is tracked in AU.

Method

To determine MaSH, we will cast each of a class's skills as many times as necessary in order to achieve the highest damage in one strike from the final activation of a single skill. This category does not consider any sort of average (beyond that already implied by AU) -- it does not find the highest roll of damage, just the highest mean. If some skills are buffs that do not affect damage, we will ignore those. If a buff does affect damage, then it will be included as if its duration were infinite. DoT ticks are not counted toward this total.

Because MaSH generally does not consider time or mana, its output will be expressed in AU.

Guardian

Guardian is clearly designed to stack marks then use either Dragon's Breath or Healing Strike, so this is a straightforward calculation.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU Guardian Strike Guardian Strike Guardian Strike Dragon's Breath

AU

- - - - 3 1 3
Time (s): 3.5 3.5 3.5 2 - 12.5
Mana: 16 16 16 33 - 81
MaSH-ET (AU/s) MaSH-EM (AU/M)
3/12.5 3/81
0.240 0.037

MaSH-ET and -EM are not very good metrics. MaSH-ET is the more useful of the two because it provides better info than MaSH for how good a class is at drawing aggro. MaSH-EM is a mostly meaningless number, though it can reveal which classes have very interactive skills (a low number), or whether their skills are more independent (a high score). That's not a noteworthy metric for damage, though.

Mage

Mage has no interaction between its abilities, so its is forced to rely on a single Fireball.

Autoattack Skill 0

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU Fireball

AU

- 3 1 3
Time (s): 4 - 4
Mana: 25 - 25
MaSH-ET (AU/s) MaSH-EM (AU/M)
3/4 3/25
0.750 0.120

Mage is pretty good at drawing aggro quickly, according to MaSH-ET.

Rogue

Building up to a huge Scorpion Tail Strike is the main schtick of the Rogue class. The skills have been ordered in a way that makes the most practical sense to ensure the combo goes off; under the terms of this metric the order (except for STS being last) does not matter.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3

Skill 4

Skill 5 Skill 6

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU Poison Strike Poison Strike Stealth Poison Strike Spin Kick Poison Strike Scorpion Tail Strike

AU

- - - x2.0 STS dmg - x1.2 dmg - 2 - -
After multipliers: - - - - - - 4.8 1 4.8
Time (s): 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 - 14
Mana: 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 - 112
MaSH-ET (AU/s) MaSH-EM (AU/M)
4.8/14 4.8/112
0.343 0.043

Rogue is not very good at drawing aggro from a single hit quickly.

Warrior

Warrior has one buff, and its two primary damage-dealing skills both deal the same amount of damage at their optimal. Vorpal Strike was chosen as the skill to be used for this metric because it is single-target like the others, and because it uses less mana and doesn't require the user to be at low health, and thus is more practical.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 2

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU War Cry Vorpal Strike

AU

- x1.1 dmg 2 1 -
After multipliers: - 2.2 1 2.2
Time (s): 2 2 - 4
Mana: 33 16 - 49
MaSH-ET (AU/s) MaSH-EM (AU/M)
2.2/4 2.2/49
0.550 0.045

Warrior is not bad at drawing aggro quickly. And, the MaSH-EM shows that it's somewhat efficient at it, too -- if you discount the warcry and assume that it would have been up anyway, then warrior becomes incredibly efficient (0.138 AU/M) at drawing aggro.

Damage per Mana

Damage per Mana is not a vectorized scalar, it is a proper vector created with being a vector in mind. It does not have any appended qualifiers.

Method

Damage per mana (dpm, DPM) is a mean of the AU of each skill divided by the mana it cost to activate the skill. It does not consider the interactions between skills, time, and durations. It does include full DoT damage, and assumes that buffs are up for the use of every skill.

Buffs are defined as long-duration skills that have no effect beyond increasing damage or changing mana requirements. If a skill deals both damage and applies a buff/debuff, that de/buff is not considered to affect other skills. DPM attempts to keep each skill as separate as possible, so as not to assume any rotations or variation through combinations of skills. It will include two calculations, one including buffs and their cost, and another without. Whichever is the better result will be used for final DPM. The equation is this:



Average\ AU\ per\ mana\ = \frac{1}{n} \times 

\sum_{i=1}^n \frac{AU_i}{mana_i}

It seems complicated since it's a summation, but using it is easy. "n" is the number of damaging skills, and "i" is each of those skills (eg i = skill 1, i+1 = skill 2, etc). The summation is just shorthand for this:

\left ( 

\frac{skill\ 1\ AU}{skill\ 1\ mp} + \frac{skill\ 2\ AU}{skill\ 2\ mp} + \ldots + \frac{skill\ n\ AU}{skill\ n\ mp}

 \right )

/\ \left (number\ of\ damaging\ skills \right)

Remember to calculate the AU/mana fractions before adding them together! Think of DPM as the average damage efficiency of a class's skills. To help make these numbers seem less abstract, you can consider that if 1 AU costing 16 mana is a baseline, then 0.063 is the benchmark for this metric. Numbers smaller than 0.063 AU/M indicate inefficiency, and numbers larger indicate efficiency.

Guardian

DPM is only the calculation of skills used in isolation, so Dragon's Breath does not benefit from Marks in this metric.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU/M)
1 AU Guardian Strike Dragon's Breath Healing Strike Guardian's Oath

AU/M

- 1/16 2/33 0.6/25 - 1 0.062

Mage

Mage has no buffs or other interacting skills, so DPM is straightforward for it.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU/M)
1 AU Fireball Lightning Strike Magic Shockwave Mana Shield

AU/M

- 3/25 2/33 2/55 0 1 0.072

Rogue

Rogue both suffers and benefits in this category. Its skills function better when they interact, but even when they don't, it still has high efficiency. Further, it does have long-duration buffs that it can apply to its skills under this metric.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU/M)
1 AU Stealth Spin Kick Poison Strike Scorpion Tail Strike

AU/M

- x2.0 STS dmg x1.2 dmg, 0.5/16 1.25/16 1/16 1 -
After multipliers: (16 mp) 0.5/16 1.5/16 2.2/16 1 0.064
No buffs: - - 1.25/16 1/16 1 0.070
Stealth only: (16 mp) - 1.25/16 2/16 1 0.070

Warrior

Warrior's skills are more about utility than efficiency, so it suffers under this metric. Luckily, it has the very efficient Vorpal Strike to help buoy its score. DPM assumes whirlwind is only hitting one target, so that skill can become much more mana-efficient if you are facing multiple targets. Warrior does have a long-duration buff that it can use.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU/M)
1 AU War Cry Rending Cut Vorpal Strike Whirlwind

AU/M

- x1.1 dmg 0.5/16 2/16 2/33 1 -
After multipliers: (33 mp) 0.55/16 2.2/16 2.2/33 1 0.068
No buffs: - 0.5/16 2/16 2/33 1 0.072

Single Rotation Damage

Single Rotation Damage (SiR, or SIR) is the maximum amount of damage that a class gets out of using its abilities through one "rotation". SiR does not consider time, autoattacks, number of foes, or mana use. It does consider buffs, skill interaction, cooldowns, and DoT damage. 

Method

A rotation is the cycle of abilities a player would reasonably use in a specific order in order to optimize damage for a short period of time. For example, Guardian's rotation would be three Guardian Strikes then a Dragon Breath. For classes whose skills do not interact to change damage output, SiR is calculated as the maximum skill activations possible in an amount of time equal to the cooldown of the skill with the longest cooldown. For example, Mage would include as many skills that could fit into the 15-second cooldown of Magic Shockwave; it would cast Magic Shockwave first in its SiR rotation.

Global CD is assumed to be 1 second; each skill's casting time is assumed to be 1 second unless it's obviously otherwise (such as a channeled ability). Autoattacks are not inlcuded in any way in this calculation; between Global CD and skill CD, it's likely that you'll be able to use several of them during a rotation.

SiR is a good metric to compare against both time and mana, so SiR-ET and SiR-EM will be included for each class as well. Do note that this metric is more comparable across time than it is against mana, so don't put too much weight on SiR-EM as a method of comparing classes; use it instead for helping to calculate mana requirements when gearing.

SiR-ET will not include the cooldown time of the final skill, since in many cases that skill's CD will not affect the start of the next rotation. The time calculations are a little difficult to nail down explicitly, but the time entries show how long it is until the next skill can be activated. When cooldowns create a large downtime period when no skills can be used (2 seconds or more), it will be noted with an empty skill column. These are times when autoattacks should be almost certain to be possible to use.

Much like DPM, 0.063 is a good baseline for the typical efficiency of SiR-EM. Higher than that means the class is more efficient, and less is less efficient.

Guardian

Guardian's skills interact well, amd it has two that benefit from the same resource. For the purposes of a typical rotation, we'll assume that it's using Dragon's Breath over Healing Strike in order to prioritize damage over healing. If your expected rotation instead includes Healing Strike, then your mana cost will be lower.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU Guardian Strike Guardian Strike Guardian Strike Dragon's Breath

AU

- 1 1 1 3 1 6
Time (s): 3.5 3.5 3.5 1 - 11.5
Mana: 16 16 16 33 - 81
SiR-ET (AU/s) SiR-EM (AU/M)
6/11.5 6/81
0.522 0.074

Mage

Mage's skills do not interact, so these have been set up in order to  push the most damage during the cooldown of Shockwave. Since Fireball ticks every 3 seconds, we'll assume that the first fireball gets 1 ttick, while the second gets all 3 ticks.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3 Skill 4

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU Magic Shockwave Lightning Strike Fireball Fireball Lightning Strike

AU

- 2 2 3.5 4.5 2 1 14
Time (s): 2 2 4 4 2 - 14
Mana: 55 33 25 25 33 - 171
SiR-ET (AU/s) SiR-EM (AU/M)
14/14 14/171
1.0 0.082

Rogue

Rogue has a lot of potential skill rotations; we'll be using the most "smooth" one -- the one that has the least downtime during which you're just waiting on cooldowns. It does deal less damage, but it probably has a better SiR-ET score. Poison Strike ticks once before the next can be applied, so each PS includes at least one tick or more, depending on whether there's another immediately after.

Due to the complexity of this class's skill rotation, there may be a better order than this one. However, this seems to be the best one just by looking at the interactions of the buffs: Stealth adds 2 AU for 2 seconds and 16 mana; very efficient. Spin Kick adds 1.95 AU for 2 seconds and 16 mana, also above average. A second spin kick after Stealth would add a bit more than 0.85 AU, for 2 s and 16 mp, but it would also change the second spin kick's timing due to the cooldowns conflicting -- I don't think it ends up being a net efficiency gain, even if it slightly increases the total damage ouput.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 2 3 4 5 6

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU Stealth Poison Strike PS Spin Kick PS PS Scorpion Tail Strike

AU

- x2.0 STS 0.75 1 x1.2 dmg, 0.5 0.75 1.25 2 1 6.25
After Multipliers: - 0.75 1 - .9 1.5 4.8 1 9.45
Time (s): 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 - 14
Mana: 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 - 112
SiR-ET (AU/s) SiR-EM (AU/M)
9.45/14 9.45/112
0.675 0.084

Warrior

Warrior's skills do interact, however, they pose a challenge in how to measure one rotation. Should it be all the skills that fit into War Cry's cooldown? Or, should it be just as many activations as a player can make before they're stuck waiting on cooldowns to start again? This latter method almost perfectly defines what a rotation is, and thus will be used. Following this latter approach will also give a total duration closer to that of the other classes (around 12 seconds), which will help the SiR-ET be a more accurate comparison.

The Warrior is assumed to be at a sliver of health for this metric (even if that doesn't make a ton of sense in the context of rotations...) in order for Whirlwind to be at its peak efficiency.

There's some tricks we can use to skew the warrior's numbers in favour of this metric -- specifically, using Vorpal Strike before Rending Cut in order to get an extra Vorpal Strike at the end of the rotation since it will be off cooldown again. In real play, a player might decide to instead use Rending Cut, Vorpal Strike, Whirlwind and be done with the rotation.

This metric is all about max damage in the shortest time with an eye towards repeatability, and denying the warrior any of the same optimization that might have been granted to the Rogue using only 1 Spin Kick instead of 2 like a player might reasonably decide to do) is against the spirit of these metrics. These metrics are to highlight strengths, and the Warrior should be allowed to make its best showing in this metic, just like all classes do for all other metrics.

Lastly! War Cry does not really increase your damage or efficiency very much when you're solo (+.65 AU for 2 seconds and 33 mana; very inefficient), so it has been included in the table as a reference, but not in the calculations. We assume that many players will be using War Cry anyway, since in any situation where you're making more than one rotation or where there's multiple players, it suddenly becomes far more efficient. For example, you can fit something like RC x2, VS x3, and Whirlwind x3 into one War Cry duration, for a total of +1.3 AU, which isn't great efficiency, but when coupled with the autoattacks that will definitely be in the gaps between RC and Whirlwind CDs, the real number is higher.

Autoattack Skill 0 Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3 - Skill 4

Class Equality Multiplier

Sum (AU)
1 AU War Cry Vorpal Strike Rending Cut Whirlwind extra time Vorpal Strike

AU

- (x1.1)* 2 0.5 2 0 2 1 6.5
After Mulipliers: - 2.2 .55 2.2 0 2.2 1 (7.15)*
Time (s): (2)* 2 2 2 1** 2 - 9
Mana: (33)* 16 25 25 0 33 - 99

* War Cry is shown for reference, but the numbers are not inlcuded in the calculation for the final metric results. ** Although in theory you should need to wait an extra second after Whirlwind before Vorpal Strike is off CD again, in practice that's not the case. In order to stay true to the assumptions of the metric, the extra time is included in calculations. Just keep it in mind when you're playing.

SiR-ET (AU/s) SiR-EM (AU/M)
6.5/9 6.5/99
0.722 0.066





More types of analysis will be added; this article is still under construction.

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